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5.1.4 Care Planning Guidance

This chapter should be read in conjunction with Permanence Planning Procedure.

See LCS User Guide.

AMENDMENT

In March 2016, an amendment was made to the final bullet point in Section 10.5, Section 3 - The Plan.


Contents

1. Who Must Have a Care Plan
2. Who is Responsible for the Plan
3. Timescales for Completion
4. Approval of the Plan
5. Consultation
6. Purpose
7. Review
8. Contents
9. Circulation
10. The Care Plan
  10.1 Guidance
  10.2 Front Sheet
  10.3 Section 1- About the Child About the Child and their Strengths and Needs
  10.4 Section 2- Summary and Analysis
  10.5 Section 3- The Plan
  10.6 Section 4-Views of Others
  10.7 Section 5- Final Sheet
11. The Child's Care Plan
12. The Child's Permanency Report
13. The Court Care Plan
14. Special Guardianship Report
15. The Action Plan

Click here for LCS Guidance


1. Who Must Have a Care Plan

1.1

Care Plans with a clear pathway as to how permanency will be achieved and within what timeframe, are required, for all looked after children except for those who start to be looked after at age 15+ years where the needs assessment and pathway plan form the  permanence plan (see Care Leavers and Transition to Adulthood Procedure).

Every child in care or who is the subject of care proceedings must have a Care Plan. The Care Plan describes how the child will be cared for in the immediate future but importantly includes the plan and arrangements as to how the child will be cared for permanently until they are an adult.
1.2 The care plan incorporates information held in the child's Individual Personal Education Plan and their Health Care Plan. Every child in care must have a Child and Family Assessment which provides the information to inform the care plan.
1.3 Where a child becomes the subject of proceedings, an interim care plan must be provided to inform the court how and where the child will be cared for the duration of the proceedings. A final care plan is presented at the end of the proceedings which includes the plan for permanence. The care plans both interim and final that are presented to court have specific templates to ensure that the report is concise and addresses the specific information the court will need. This guidance makes clear this distinction. (See Section 13, The Court Care Plan).
1.4 Where the plan for the child is adoption including adoption by Connected Person (family and friends) or foster carers, a Child Permanency Report (CPR) must be presented to the Agency Decision Maker. The CPR includes information from the care plan.
1.5 The relevant Safeguarding Services Manager must authorise the permanence plan where the plan for the child is placement with a relative or friend or foster carer under a Special Guardianship Order. A report is filed with the Court. The content of the report is prescribed by Statutory Guidance and is a specific template but sections can be completed from the care plan. It must be jointly authorised by the relevant Safeguarding and Fostering Services Managers. This guidance makes clear where this is possible. (See Section 13, The Court Care Plan). Where the plan is for Long Term Fostering the child’s permanence report will need consideration at Fostering Panel.
1.6 In Hertfordshire the care plan is a document that can be used to secure resources for the child. e.g. a placement. The Hertfordshire Access to Resources Panel has a separate referral form but the care plan will be a key source document that the Panel will use in approving resources to meet the child's needs.


2. Who is Responsible for the Plan

2.1 The Care Plan must be completed and updated by the child's social worker (the allocated social worker).
2.2 The Team Manager and/or Services Manager are responsible for signing off the care plan and the CPR. The final court care plan must additionally be signed by the Head of Service.
2.3 Court care plans, the SGO court report or the CPR must be provided to managers at least 5 working days before the date of filing or submission to allow for amendments. In practice this is insufficient time if the plan needs comprehensive revision. It is better to prepare these plans well before the deadline.
2.4

The allocated social worker is responsible for the following actions and reports with advice from colleagues from Family Placement staff

  • Requesting advice from Adoption and Fostering Services;
  • The Care Plan*;
  • The CPR*;
  • The SGO Report*;
  • Child Arrangements Order Report.
2.5

The Family Placement workers and managers in Fostering and Adoption will provide advice in the care plan regarding achieving permanency for the child or regarding the appropriate placement. This may be necessary throughout the duration of care proceedings and beyond. Adoption workers provide advice in the completion of the CPR and are specifically responsible for:

  • The child's profile*;
  • Advertising information when required;
  • The matching report matching child and adopters;
  • The Introductions Plan;
  • The Adoption Support Plan*;
  • Rule 29 report presented at the final Adoption Hearing*;
  • Any family finding report requested by court or Adoption Panel.
*Indicates that reports will need to be produced jointly with contributions and discussion between the Adoption worker and the allocated social worker.
2.6 Family and Friends Supervising Social Workers work with the child's social worker to complete the assessment of connected persons who are either already caring for a looked after child who was placed in an emergency or who are proposing to care for looked after child on a long term basis either as a foster carer or under a Special Guardianship Order (SGO). The Family and Friends Worker complete the part of the SGO report that relates to the carers.
2.7 Where the plan for the child is long term or permanent fostering, the Fostering Teams will find families and with the allocated social worker will jointly prepare a matching report that is presented to the Fostering Panel.
2.8 The Independent Reviewing Officer (IRO) is responsible for reviewing the care plan and identifying any issues of drift and delay. The IRO may escalate the issues for specific children where issues if drift and delay are not addressed.


3. Timescales for Completion

3.1 The Care Plan must be drawn up as soon as the need for the child to become the subject of court proceedings and/or come into care has been identified. It should be completed prior to the child's first placement or, if this is impracticable within 10 working days of the child's first placement. A Care Plan must be available for the first court hearing in care proceedings. See Decision to Look After and Initial Care Planning Procedure.
3.2 If there are exceptional reasons that prevent the Care Plan from being drawn up prior to the child's placement, the key objectives of the child's admission to care and the proposed placement must still be identified and recorded.
3.3 The Care Plan is a living document and should be updated by the social worker, with the Team Manager's approval, at any time as changes occur but where there is significant change this must be approved by the Services Manager and in the case of a looked after child shared with the IRO.
3.4 The Care Plan is then subject to scrutiny at each Looked After Review and should be updated after each Review. Any significant changes must be signed off by the Services Manager.
3.5 In care proceedings an interim care plan must be filed with the application whether the child is to remain with the birth family or if removal to care is requested/planned. Dates for filing a final Care Plan will be determined by the court in conjunction with the timetable for the child.
3.6 The CPR is presented to the Agency Decision Maker in conjunction with the timing around the proceedings. The Agency Decision Maker’s recommendation that the plan for the child should be adoption is required before a Placement Order can be obtained However, all assessments within the proceedings need to have been completed before the Agency Decision Maker can make a recommendation and occasionally this means that there is little time between the availability of an expert's assessment and the date for filing of a final care plan.
3.7 Where a baby is relinquished for adoption, the CPR will be presented to the Agency Decision Maker by the Adoption Worker for a recommendation that adoption is in the baby's best interests. The baby cannot be matched with prospective adopters until the mother or (more rarely) both parents have given consent to CAFCASS for adoption.
3.8 Applications for SGO's may be made by Connected Persons regarding a child in proceedings in which case, the court timetable will include the filing of a report concerning the SGO application. It is a legal requirement that the local authority complete the SGO report within twelve weeks of the date of notification of the SGO application.
3.9 See the process for progressing an application for an SGO application (see Special Guardianship Orders Policy and Procedure).
3.10 See Long Term Fostering Procedure.


4. Approval of the Plan

4.1 A final Care Plan taken before the court in care proceedings must be endorsed and signed by the relevant Head of Service See Interim-Final Care Plan.
4.2 All other Care Plans must be endorsed and signed by the social worker's Team Manager and/or Services Manager


5. Consultation

5.1

The social worker is responsible for drawing up and updating the Care Plan in consultation with:

  1. The child;
  2. The child's parents;
  3. Anyone who is not a parent but has been caring for or looking after the child;
  4. Other members of the child's family network who are significant to the child;
  5. The child's school or the education service;
  6. The relevant health trust(s);
  7. The Youth Offending Service, if the child is known to them;
  8. Any other agency involved with the child's care;
  9. The Adoption Service unless the child is over 10;
  10. The Fostering Service.
5.2 The Adoption and Fostering Services will provide advice about achieving permanence for the child and this should be specifically recorded in the care plan. Where the child is one of a sibling group, Adoption workers may assist in making decisions about whether the children should be separated or placed together. There is a presumption that siblings are placed together unless the needs of the children preclude this.


6. Purpose

6.1 The purpose of the plan is to safeguard and promote the interests of the child, prevent drift and focus work on achieving permanence for the child.
6.2 The care plan describes the needs of the child and how those needs will be met in whichever are the most appropriate care arrangements. Wherever possible the plan should direct how the child will move out of care. If the child has to remain in care, the care plan will describe how they will be cared for to best meet their needs and deliver good outcomes in a stable and secure situation.
6.3 The Care Plan is derived initially from the elements of the Child and Family Assessment and the ongoing assessment of the child and their birth family. If there are proceedings in court, an interim court care plan describes how the child will be cared for the duration of the proceedings. A final court care plan is required at the end of proceedings. Before a court grants a Care Order it must be satisfied that a suitable care plan has been drawn up and approve that plan as reflecting the best interests of the child.
6.4 If the plan for the child is adoption, the child's permanency report (CPR) (see Herts Compass) must be presented to the Adoption panel. This incorporates the child's care plan as well as other information. The CPR is a key document when subsequently matching the child with approved adopters.
6.5 Elements of the care plan will also feed into the report presented to the Adoption Panel and subsequently to court in respect of a Special Guardianship Application.


7. Review

7.1 This guidance should be read in conjunction with Looked After Reviews Procedure.
7.2 The Care Plan is a live document and must be kept up to date. It must be regularly reviewed at Looked After Reviews. However, it is the responsibility of the social worker and his/her practice manager to make decisions and amendments in relation to the Care Plan which will be endorsed ultimately by the Services Manager.
7.3 By the time of the second Looked After Review, the Care Plan must contain a plan for achieving permanence for the child within a timescale that is realistic, achievable and meets the child's needs. The Care Plan must contain advice from the Adoption and Fostering workers as to the best means of achieving permanence. For children who are the subject of care proceedings the permanence planning timescales must tie in to the Public Law Outline (PLO) timescales. See Permanence.
7.4 All subsequent Reviews should review the progress and validity of the permanence plan. Where the IRO identifies that drift and delay are occurring and the care plan is not achieved, the matter will be escalated to senior managers. The IRO has the right to initiate court proceedings should there be persistent and serious failure to deliver good outcomes through the care plan for the child.


8. Contents

8.1

Each section in the care plan (Section 9, Circulation) contains suggestions of issues, facts or analysis that should be included. Please remember that the child's care plan is a major source document for:

  • The child reading their file as an adult;
  • Various teams e.g. Brokerage, Fostering, Adoption who need information about the child in order to provide resources to meet their needs including placements;
  • The courts in making a final decision about the child's future;
  • Adoption and other Panel members and the Agency Decision Maker in formulating decisions about the necessary plan for the child.
8.2 Research indicates that the more detailed the care plan, the more likely it is to be successful in achieving good outcomes. Actions to deliver the care plan should be specific, measurable, achievable, reviewable and time specific. (SMART).
8.3 Before the child's future is decided upon, it is likely that the care plan should contain two or more parallel plans. An example might be reunification with parents but also adoption. The care plan will describe how each strand will be progressed until it becomes clear which is the appropriate plan for permanence. Once it is clear the care plan will reflect the single course that will be pursued.
8.4 The care plans for looked after children should contain what the contingency will be if the placement breaks down whilst the child is under 18. In the case of adoption or SGO, applicants should consider who would care for the child in the unlikely event of their death etc. For children remaining in foster care, the contingency needs to explore what alternative carers would be available and how this would be arranged.
8.5 The Care Plan should incorporate information from the child's Personal Education Plan and their Health Care Plan.
8.6 Where a young person is aged 15+ the care plan should incorporate the Pathway Plan which describes how the young person will be assisted towards independence.
8.7

With regard to a young child, it is helpful to refer to the following charts in assessing and determining their needs:

Assessing Emotional Attachment- (see A Child's Journey through Placement,by Vera Fahlberg, published by BAAF in 2004 - ISBN: 9781 873868 13 8).
8.8

The Care Plan should include the name of the Independent Reviewing Officer. And the following information concerning the management and support by the local authority:

  • Who is to be responsible for implementing the plan;
  • Who is responsible for implementing specific tasks within the plan;
  • Date of last and next Looked After Review;
  • Contingency Plan if the placement breaks down or if preferred placement is not available;
  • Arrangements for input by the child, parent and others in the ongoing decision-making process;
  • Arrangements for notifying the responsible local authority of disagreements about the implementation of the Care Plan or for making representations/complaints.
8.9 For CLA plans an action plan should be drawn up that summarises the action with time limits that will be completed. For court plans, any actions should be detailed in the content of the court care plan.


9. Circulation

9.1

Following signing off by the appropriate manager, (See Section 4, Approval of the Plan) the Care Plan must be circulated to the following people:

  • The child, depending on age and understanding - care must be taken to ensure the child understands it. The child's version of the care plan (Section 11, The Child's Care Plan below) should be provided in most cases. If necessary, the child should be given additional material, suitable to his/her needs and abilities, which can better explain the Care Plan;
  • The parent(s) - who may also require help to understand the plan;
  • Providers/carers (with leave of the Court if the child is subject to proceedings and the providers/carers are not parties to those proceedings) - if no Care Plan has been drawn up prior to the child's placement, the social worker must ensure that the providers/carers understand the key objectives of the plan, and how the placement will help achieve these objectives;
  • The Independent Reviewing Officer.


10. The Care Plan

10.1 Guidance

Throughout the plan, the texts in red are suggestions for information that should be included. However workers need to be discerning and only include information relevant to the age and circumstances of the child in question.

10.2 Front Sheet

Child (name and d.o.b.)
LCS Number
Social worker
Independent Reviewing Officer
Date of Last Review
Date of Next Review

10.3 Section 1- About the Child and their Strengths and Needs

Identity

  • Where the child was born;
  • Their ethnic origin and nationality;
  • Cultural heritage;
  • Religious heritage and whether child has any religious beliefs;
  • Language;
  • Sexual orientation;
  • Irrespective of the above, how the child sees themself.

Social Presentation

  • Physical Description;
  • How does the child present to professionals, carers present and past, social worker;
  • The child's likes and dislikes;
  • Is the child usually dressed appropriate to weather, age etc;
  • Is the child friendly/responsive to others;
  • Can the child share with others;
  • Does the child take part in social activities commensurate with age including any organised activities?

Emotional and Behavioural Development

  • Who is child attached to and the qualities of that attachment;
  • What are the age appropriate behaviours that the child exhibits indicative of good attachments;
  • Is the child happy and how does the child show this;
  • Is the child disturbed and what behaviours are exhibited as a result;
  • Has the child any identified disorders/emotional difficulties;
  • Has the child required interventions by CAMHS and if so what are these.

Health

  • How is the child's general health?
  • Does child have any disabilities or health issues;
  • Has child had appropriate immunisations;
  • Does the child have healthy teeth?
  • Does child need/wear glasses?
  • Does child have regular exercise?
  • How will health needs be met- include elements of the health plan;
  • Include date health Plan was drawn up and by whom.

Education

  • Give details of where the child does well, either meeting appropriate milestones or exceeding these;
  • The child's likes and dislikes at school/nursery;
  • For a young child give details development and whether this is within usual limits for their age. Give details of any issues or difficulties;
  • Describe what the child might be expected to achieve in the longer future;
  • Does the child have any idea of their wishes re a career and education?
  • If at school give details of what child has achieved and how any difficulties are being addressed in PEP;
  • Give date PEP was completed, by whom and how objectives are being achieved.

Self-care skills

  • Describe what child can do to manage their self care;
  • What does the child need help with and how will this be addressed;
  • What does the child need help with to get ready for school?
  • If older can the young person cook/prepare a snack or drink/manage their money/manage their possessions/manage money and shopping.

Family and Friends

  • Who does the child see regularly/infrequently;
  • Describe the quality of the child's relationships with all significant adults, siblings and other close friends;
  • Are there people the child would like to see but doesn't? Why have their wishes not been acceded to.

Current Contact Arrangements

  • Provide exact details of arrangements for and purpose of contact in meeting child's needs (specifying contact relationship e.g. parent, step-parent, other family member, former carer, friend, sibling(s) including those that are looked after that may have a separate placement or remain with birth family;
  • Include details of any court orders made under section 8 or 34 and how these have been fulfilled;
  • Describe current contact arrangements.

Child's Wishes and Feelings

  • Describe the child's views;
  • Give details of where these have/have not been acted upon and why?
  • Give reasons for supporting views or explanations of why wishes, views have not been given absolute precedence;
  • If child's wishes are being overruled give details of what you think the impact may be on them and what will be provided to assist the child in this process;
  • For a young child use observations to inform how the child reacts and responds to people they know and care for them.

10.4 Section 2- Summary and Analysis

Overall Aim of Care Plan

  • Discuss which of the child's strengths and needs may be more important and why;
  • Include what specific advice was provided by Adoption and Fostering Workers that has informed the conclusions about the care plan;
  • Describe how the plan's objectives will best meet the needs of the child;
  • Detail the aim of the plan and summary of proposed timetable.

10.5 Section 3- The Plan

Options for the Immediate Future

List all options and indicate why each is/is not appropriate to meet the needs of the child. Include:

  • Remain/Return to parent(s) under no order/ISO/ I CO. If an ICO has the Head of Safeguarding approved this placement under Care Planning, Placement and Case Review Regulations 2010;
  • Placement with relatives or friends under an ICO or IRO or section 20;
  • Placement with foster carer under ICO/section 20;
  • In thinking about which order is appropriate consideration has to be given as to why it is necessary to share parental responsibility with the birth parent(s);
  • Give details of what parallel plans are to be pursued and the timeframe for actions in respect of both;
  • Any assessments that are proposed for relatives/friends for future placements and dates for completion.

Details of Proposed/Current Placement

  • Where will the child be living in the immediate future;
  • Time that is likely to elapse before any proposed placement is made if child is to move;
  • How will child move there?
  • Likely duration of the placement;
  • Arrangements for reunification/rehabilitation;
  • Specific details of the birth parents' role in day to day arrangements;
  • Arrangements for health care including consent to examination and treatment;
  • Arrangements for education (including any pre-school day care/activity);
  • What arrangements will be in place to address any issues of the child's needs that cannot be met by the placement;
  • Details of proposed support services in the placement for the carers;
  • Whether the child is placed with siblings and if not why not;
  • Indicate where siblings will be placed;
  • What contingency plans have been made in the event of any difficulties with the placement or if it suddenly breaks down before the final plan can be implemented;
  • Any possible issues e.g. foster carers' holidays that might impact on contact or assessments during proceedings;
  • How placement will be monitored;
  • Other services to be provided to the child;
  • Other services to be provided to the parents and other family members.

Contact Arrangements

  • Provide details of proposed contact arrangements including who child will see, frequency and where;
  • Will this be supervised and by whom;
  • Give dates of changes and how these will be managed;
  • Include any proposals to restrict or terminate contact and how this will be managed e.g. a final visit to a birth parent;
  • Give details where contact arrangements pose any risks e.g. an older child visiting their parent without carer's knowledge;
  • Any issues of contact that child would like to have but cannot be arranged for reasons of safety or person's whereabouts not known;
  • Include arrangements where there is to be no direct contact but where birth family members will be kept in touch with the child's progress e.g. annual photograph, information at time of each CLA review etc.

Options for Permanence

List all options for permanence and indicate why each is/is not appropriate to meet the needs of the child

Include:

  • Remain/Return to parent(s) under no order/SO/CO. If a CO the Head of Safeguarding must approve the placement under Placement with Parent Regulations;
  • Placement with family and friends. This means that the child will not remain in care and if the placement is good enough it will be expected that the child leaves care either through adoption or an SGO;
  • Adoption by approved "stranger" adopters;
  • Placement with foster carer under CO. This could eventually lead to the foster carer applying for an SGO or an Adoption Order. If this is not envisaged please indicate why not;
  • Other placement e.g. residential care, independent living for an older teenager;
  • Of the preferred permanent arrangements describe exactly how this will be achieved and in what time frame;
  • Give reasons why adoption is not being considered for a child under ten;
  • Give details of what contingency plans will be in place if the placement breaks down whilst the child is under 18. In the case of adoption or SGO, adopters and relatives should consider who would care for the child in the event of their death etc. For children remaining in foster care, the contingency needs to explore what alternative carers would be available and how this would be arranged;
  • In the event of the placement ending before the child reaches adulthood. In the case of adopters or relatives they need to plan for alternative.

Details of Current and Proposed Placement

  • Where is child living currently;
  • If the child's future placement involves a move, give details of when and how this will be managed to minimise disruption to the child including reunification or placement with a parent or family member not currently caring for the child;
  • If the plan is adoption advice from Adoption Service as to how many prospective adopters are available for the child and a rough timetable to include date of presentation at Adoption Panel and matching process. Also how once a suitable family is identified how the process of moving the child will be planned;
  • Specific details of the birth parents' role in day to day arrangements prior and if appropriate after the permanent placement has been achieved;
  • Whilst child is in care and after arrangements for health care including consent to examination and treatment;
  • Arrangements for education (including any pre-school day care/activity) both whilst in care and afterwards;
  • Details of proposed support services in the placement for the carers;
  • How placement will be monitored and supported while child is in care and support arrangements post adoption/SGO or reunification;
  • Other services to be provided to the child;
  • Other services to be provided to the parents and other family members;
  • If SGO when was this presented to the Agency Decision Maker and did she or she support the plan;
  • What arrangements will be in place to address any issues of the child's needs that cannot be met by the placement;
  • Whether the child is placed with siblings and if not why not. Indicate where siblings will be placed;
  • If the child is to remain with foster carers, give details of how the placement will be assessed and recognised as a permanent arrangement;
  • Give details of contingency plans. This is particularly important where the plan is adoption but finding a suitable family may be difficult. Include contingency in the event of the fostering placement breaking down;
  • How will placement if to continue will be monitored and reviewed.

Contact Arrangements

  • Provide details of proposed contact arrangements including who child will see, frequency and where both in any interim period and in the permanent arrangement;
  • Will this be supervised and by whom;
  • Give dates of changes and how these will be managed;
  • Include any proposals to restrict or terminate contact and how this will be managed e.g. a final visit to a birth parent;
  • Give details where contact arrangements pose any risks e.g. an older child visiting their parent without carer's knowledge;
  • Any issues of contact that child would like to have but cannot be affected for reasons of safety or person's whereabouts not known;
  • Include arrangements where there is to be no direct contact but where birth family members will be kept in touch with the child's progress e.g. annual photograph, information at time of each CLA review etc.;
  • Where a child is remaining in care include any plans to appoint an independent visitor, and if one is appointed, Care Plans and Placement Plans should include the frequency of visits. and that this arrangement is reviewed at each review.

10.6 Section 4-Views of Others

  • Include the wishes and views of the child's parents and anyone else with a sufficient interest in the child (including representatives of other agencies, current and former carers) or who the local authority consider relevant to the child;
  • Include not only what the views of the relevant person are in relation to what they want, but also their views on the Local Authority's proposed plan, change to plan (if different);
  • Give the reasons for supporting them or explanations of why wishes/ views have not been given absolute precedence.

10.7 Section 5- Final Sheet

Click here for Section 5- Final Sheet


11. The Child's Care Plan

11.1 In every case where the child looked after is over 5, a care plan should be produced that explains things to the child and what will happen for them in language and format that is commensurate with their level of understanding.
11.2 The template provides ideas of what could/should be included under each section of a child's version. It is a useful tool to use in work with the child to discuss their needs, issues and future arrangements.
11.3 This is not an exhaustive list but uses prompts to explain to the child/young person what issues there are for them and what will happen in the future.
11.4 Any discrepancy between the child's views and the views of others, including the social work staff, needs to be explained carefully. It is important to be open and honest so that the child is able to understand what may happen for them and the reasons for this.
11.5 In each section, questions are asked as to who will help. The plan should include specific things that will change. For an older teenager it may be tempting simply to give them the adult version of their care plan but working through with them each aspect of their plan can ensure that they fully understand everything.
11.6 Explain clearly what needs to change and who will help with the changes and record the details. This will ensure that there is no doubt around future plans and that the young person has understood what will happen to them and for them.
11.7 The plan should be personalised in a style chosen by the young person. To change any of the design, make sure this is opened in word and that the drawing toolbar is visible. To show this, click on "view", click on "toolbars", then click on "drawing". Pictures can be imported as young person feels appropriate.


12. The Child's Permanency Report

12.1 The CPR (see Herts Compass) requires additional information for the Panel to decide whether the plan should be adoption and to approve a match of the child with prospective adopters. Much of the child's information can be gleaned and copied from the care plan as there are consistent headings.


13. The Court Care Plan

A Court Care Plan template (CSF4210) is available.


14. Special Guardianship Report

14.1 Special Guardianship Report * Front Sheet

(The court report must be authorised by both the relevant Services Manager for Safeguarding and Fostering)
In the case No: County Court
In the matter of (name of case)
And matter of the Children Act 1989
Local Authority Report
Pursuant to the Special Guardianship Regulations 2005
In the matter of a Application for a Special Guardianship Order Pursuant to Section 14A of the Children Act 1989
Report prepared by social worker (s) name(s):

The sections of the SGO report are prescribed by statute. The headings of the report are below. See in red where information can be obtained from the Care Plan.

Click here for the SGO report


15. The Action Plan

The action plan below is an example that may be used with care plans.

Issue Action By whom By when Comments
Reunification with birth family        
Adoption Obtain if possible obstetrics report on birth     Mother's consent necessary
  Book adoption medical     Try to coincide with six monthly CLA medical. Must be no more than three months before Adoption Panel's decision.
  Birth parents' pack to be given to birth parents      
  Complete child's permanency report      
  Book date for Agency Decision Maker      
         
SGO        
         
         
         
Permanent Fostering Placement        

End